HOW LONG DO NEGATIVE MARKS STAY ON MY CREDIT REPORT

Typically, any type of negative information will remain on your credit report for seven years from the date of occurrence. Bankruptcies are the exception and remain for ten years. Below is a breakdown of how long different credit items (good and bad) will be listed on your credit report. It is important to note that the negative info listed is not coming from the credit bureaus but instead from your creditors. The three main credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and Trans Union are simply repositories for the data that all of your creditors, public records and/or collections agencies report.

Credit Accounts
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Your accounts that you have paid as agreed will typically stay on your credit report for as long as ten years from DLA (otherwise known as date of last activity).
- Your accounts that you do not pay as agreed will typically stay on your credit report for seven years from when the account first became delinquent.
- A late payment will stay on your credit report for seven years.

Credit Inquiries
- A credit inquiry is a record of when company has requested to view your credit report. It is required by law under the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) that you are informed of who has requested a copy of your credit report. Usually, credit inquiries remain on your credit report for two years. It is important to note that not all credit inquires will be listed on all three of your credit reports and also that not all credit inquiries will be calculated into your credit score. For example, 'soft credit pulls' will not impact your credit score at all or be reflective on your credit report. An example of a 'soft pull' is when credit card companies will view your credit profile to see if you are eligible for one of their pre-approval credit card offers. Another example of when a credit inquiry does not reflect on or effect your credit report are Account Reviews (also known as Account Monitoring). An Account Review is when your creditors execute a regular analysis of your credit file in conjunction with the account you have with them. 

Public Records
- Tax liens that are paid will stay on your credit report for seven years from the date that they were paid (released).
- Unpaid tax liens will stay on your credit report until they are paid. And once they are paid, as stated above, they will remain for seven years.
- Whether they are paid or not, judgments will stay on your credit report for seven years from the time they were filed.

Account in Collection
Any account that hits collections will stay on your credit report for seven years from the date that the account became delinquent.

Bankruptcy
- A non-discharged or dismissed chapter 13 will stay on your credit report for ten years from the date the BK was filed. The same is true for a chapter 11 or 7 bankruptcy filing.
- A chapter 13 bankruptcy that has been discharged will stay on your credit report for seven years from the filing date.

Click here to learn more about the different types of bankruptcies.

What is a FICO Score?
How Are Credit Scores are Computed?
Making Sure Your Credit Report is Accurate
How to Read a Credit Report  
Why You Should Run Your Credit Report Once a Year
The Impact of Inquiries on Your Credit Report
Correcting Your Credit Report - Writing a Dispute Letter - Sample Dispute Letter
Effects of Having Bad Credit
What are the Hardest Credit Items to Fix?
Credit Report FAQ
Things That Hurt Your Credit
Credit Report Secrets

 

 



 

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